Here lies every thought I have on the advertisements that cross my path daily and whether they are an effective platform for a brand, according to me, an aspiring strategist living in NYC.

This was completely a coincidence, I swear it! Amy Winehouse’s untimely death from drug use this past weekend did not influence my choice for today’s ad, which I actually found on Friday and planned to post today. This is the newest ad done for Nike running gear titled Addiction, a TV spot created by F/Nazca Saatchi & Saatchi in São Paolo.

The combination of the discomforting voiceover, the disturbing images, and the violent, uneven sequencing of the scenes creates one of the most hair-raising spots I have ever seen. But, strangely enough, I love it.


True, the voiceover IS extremely creepy, but the script is so well written, combining that eerie feeling with the strong emphasis on running as the unyielding addiction. This is not a typical ad from Nike, which usually uses athletes and sports-themed spots in their campaigns. It’s also, for obvious reasons, able to grab and hold the attention of its viewers, just as thriller movies do to their audiences. Very creative, very unique, and very, very weird.

(Source: adweek.com)

Warning: Disaster advertising ahead.

The vaginal-cleansing brand Summer’s Eve has always struggled with its advertising, first of all because it is not the most socially acceptable product to sell, and second, they’ve gone down a rough road with poor advertising choices (remember when they wanted to teach women how to get a raise with their product?) in the past. Unfortunately, they have continued to struggle with their campaigns, just launching All Hail The Vfrom The Richards Group.

Here’s My Gripe: What ISN’T wrong with this campaign? Let’s first look past the blatant racial connotations demonstrated in these commercials; these spots are outright creepy. I understand that their message involves overcoming the embarrassment to utter the word vagina (there, I said it) in public, but using a talking hand to replicate the female part? Strange. 

Now, back to the racism involved. What were they thinking???  I was at a planning meeting this morning that concluded with each of the intelligent agency thinkers sitting in awe and holding back hysterics wondering what possibly could have crossed the minds of those in the agency. The spot meant to target Hispanic women ends with “ay ay ay” and a Spanish slur of words while the spot for African Americans discusses how “Lady Wowza” will appear later in the night if you douche with this product before hitting the club. Totally outrageous.

As for the rest of the advertising world: PLEASE learn from this; what not to do.

(Source: New York Daily News)

Here’s a scapegoat for smokers…wait, what?
Plax’s Bad Breath Isn’t You is the latest campaign done by Young & Rubicam, New York. The campaign targets young adults, both male and female, who smoke. While the illustrations are vivid, beautifully displaying the result smoking has on the breath of the individual by showing a less-attractive person on the end of the cigarette, I can’t help but think that something is wrong with, or at least confusing about, this message.
Here’s my gripe: Every day, when I turn on the television or read a magazine, I see these extremely explicit anti-smoking PSAs and ads that reflect society’s efforts to cut down smoking because of the health risks involved. It appears that targeting smokers in this campaign’s manner makes it seem like smoking isn’t necessarily bad for you, considering there is a product, Plax, that can provide a quick fix for a smoker’s bad breath. I feel like this campaign is whispering "it’s okay if you smoke, we’ll help you cover it up,” which is not the positive light a brand like Plax should strive for in its advertising. Perhaps the brand should stick to the times and alter their target audience or their message because the bottom line for smokers is: bad breath isn’t you, but bad lungs certainly are.

Here’s a scapegoat for smokers…wait, what?

Plax’s Bad Breath Isn’t You is the latest campaign done by Young & Rubicam, New York. The campaign targets young adults, both male and female, who smoke. While the illustrations are vivid, beautifully displaying the result smoking has on the breath of the individual by showing a less-attractive person on the end of the cigarette, I can’t help but think that something is wrong with, or at least confusing about, this message.

Here’s my gripe: Every day, when I turn on the television or read a magazine, I see these extremely explicit anti-smoking PSAs and ads that reflect society’s efforts to cut down smoking because of the health risks involved. It appears that targeting smokers in this campaign’s manner makes it seem like smoking isn’t necessarily bad for you, considering there is a product, Plax, that can provide a quick fix for a smoker’s bad breath. I feel like this campaign is whispering "it’s okay if you smoke, we’ll help you cover it up,” which is not the positive light a brand like Plax should strive for in its advertising. Perhaps the brand should stick to the times and alter their target audience or their message because the bottom line for smokers is: bad breath isn’t you, but bad lungs certainly are.

I absolutely ADORE this new campaign for Absolut Blank vodka, launching in the UK this week, which is titled It All Starts With An Absolut Blank and created by TBWA/Chiat/Day New York. One of the most effective value proposition models for promoting a brand is the self-expressive model, in which consumers are urged to integrate a part of their personal identity into the product, which this TV, print, OOH, and digital campaign demonstrates wonderfully.

Absolut invited artists from a variety of creative backgrounds to create murals, collages, sculptures, and lighting pieces to fill the blank canvas that the Absolut Blank provides. Genius.

The “blank canvas” concept has been used before, off the top of my head in the AmEx Blank Canvases campaign done last year. However, what I really enjoy about this specific campaign, which separates it from the rest, is that this self-expressive approach is not a usual route taken by liquor brands. It really sets itself apart from the other alcohol campaigns out there, which is exactly what it’s meant to do. Awesome.

See the Absolut Blank TV spot here.

(Source: creativity-online.com)

Today marks a historical day in millions of Harry Potter fans’ lives: The opening day of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2, marking the end of an era for most Potter fans, like myself. In honor of such an occasion, I dedicate today’s post to the previews, both TV and print ads, that have given me chills for over a year now about the film’s release. Using the slogan, "It all ends here," this campaign kept everyone at the edge of their seat and built up immeasurable anticipation among fans around the world. I can honestly and confidently say that the movie lived up to its expectations and went beyond what I had imagined; it was FABULOUS. Anyway, great preview, incredible print ad, and a wonderful film to close one of the biggest literary phenomenons our generation has experienced. Everyone, if you enjoyed these, GO SEE THE MOVIE NOW!!!

It All Ends Here

Never write an advertisement which you wouldn’t want your family to read. You wouldn’t tell lies to your own wife. Don’t tell them to mine.
David Ogilvy

OKAY guys, thanks for creating another outlet to poke fun at the PMS female persona that “takes over” a few days a month.

Here’s the latest Got Milk campaign from the California Milk Processor Board done by Goodby, Silverstein & Partners called Everything I do Is Wrong. The campaign features both Outdoor ads as well as an interactive site that further portrays the role that milk plays in regulating PMS for men who can’t deal with the monthly stress this puts on their lives.

You have to expect controversy from a campaign like this, specifically since 80% of milk buyers are female. Poor planning if the plan was to stick with the overpowering target audience.. I’m not saying I’m insulted personally, but this definitely is not the way to win over the womens’ vote.

Aside from being immediately offensive for harping on the dreaded time for all of us, I think this campaign has a good spin to it, especially if it is targeting a male audience. I think that incorporating the witty lines that men *believe* women use to rationalize their (undoubtedly) wrong behavior really grabs the attention of an audience that would otherwise overlook milk advertising. I think the site, EverythingIDoIsWrong.org, is a really creative and clever way to attract men to the site that has games with the milk as a PMS-solution belief integrated in the gaming experience.

Everything this campaign has done is right, I don’t recommend using these lines to work as a “quick-fix” with the ladies….

(Source: adweek.com)

I have just spent the last 20 minutes at work being distracted by this interactive ad titled Wheel of Concept, done by Tibal DDB New York as a form of self-promotion.
and look at these results: "In the first 24 hours we’ve had 80,000 concept board PDFs downloaded,  50,000 unique visitors, 4,800 Facebook Likes and it looks like nearly  3,000 tweets."
Enjoy! http://www.wheelofconcept.com

I have just spent the last 20 minutes at work being distracted by this interactive ad titled Wheel of Concept, done by Tibal DDB New York as a form of self-promotion.

and look at these results:
"In the first 24 hours we’ve had 80,000 concept board PDFs downloaded, 50,000 unique visitors, 4,800 Facebook Likes and it looks like nearly 3,000 tweets."

Enjoy! http://www.wheelofconcept.com

We all know that sex sells, but has Zappos gone too far in using that concept to sell their brand? This ad campaign, More Than Just Shoes,  which features models wearing nothing but shoes in different scenes of city life, is the newest work from Mullen, an Interpublic Group ad agency. Zappos has continued to push the advertising boundaries, moving forward from its puppets campaign on service quality, which was created through a variety of TV spots.
Here’s my gripe : I’m unsure as to what Zappos is trying to accomplish with this very blunt campaign, which is why I can’t say I completely disagree with it. Sure, the campaign is clearly trying push the limits and gain attention as much, and what can be seen as desperately, as possible, but isn’t that what advertising is about? The brand wants to be seen, and it will surely succeed in that. What’s interesting also, is Mullen’s decision to launch this through digital and print media. This targets an entirely different audience than its commercials, which makes this bold campaign more hindered than, say, full frontal (get it?). At least Zappos opted to advertise this raunchier message using a slightly more subtle approach. A good luck to Zappos, for we will see whether this new strategy is bare-able for their audience.

We all know that sex sells, but has Zappos gone too far in using that concept to sell their brand? This ad campaign, More Than Just Shoes,  which features models wearing nothing but shoes in different scenes of city life, is the newest work from Mullen, an Interpublic Group ad agency. Zappos has continued to push the advertising boundaries, moving forward from its puppets campaign on service quality, which was created through a variety of TV spots.

Here’s my gripe : I’m unsure as to what Zappos is trying to accomplish with this very blunt campaign, which is why I can’t say I completely disagree with it. Sure, the campaign is clearly trying push the limits and gain attention as much, and what can be seen as desperately, as possible, but isn’t that what advertising is about? The brand wants to be seen, and it will surely succeed in that. What’s interesting also, is Mullen’s decision to launch this through digital and print media. This targets an entirely different audience than its commercials, which makes this bold campaign more hindered than, say, full frontal (get it?). At least Zappos opted to advertise this raunchier message using a slightly more subtle approach. A good luck to Zappos, for we will see whether this new strategy is bare-able for their audience.

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